Archives for posts with tag: advertisement

The videos above are Haagen-Dazs (or in Chinese 哈根达斯 – Hāgēn Dásī) 2010 ‘The Summer’ commercials. They are each around 4 minutes long and both feature stories about Chinese people’s favourite topic – love.

You may think it’s strange to have ice cream commercials in September, but as Chinese Haagen Daz fans will tell you  炙热的夏天会结束,但炙热的爱情却不会结束(zhìrè de xiàtiān huì jiéshù, dàn zhìrè de àiqíng què bù huì jiéshù) which roughly translates to:

The hot summer will end, but hot love will last forever‘.

How nice.

Jealousy International has caused an uproar from the British public through its recent promotion of the lingerie range based around Princess Diana called ‘Diana’ (戴安娜 – Dài ān nuó).

The promotion was spotted last week by a British journalist in China’s Shenzhen airport. Since then photos of the ads have been posted in newspapers / websites around the world.

Diana - Jealousy International brand

Diana - Jealousy International China (Website)

For those of you reading this blog in China, I will try to put the British upset into perspective. Princess Diana was a national heroine / treasure, she was adored by the British public when she was alive and even now 13 years after her tragic death.

Imagine if a British company started using Chairman Mao Zedong‘s image inappropriately – then that is how the majority of British people are feeling right now.

Diana - China Lingerie Brand 1

Diana - China Lingerie Brand 2

The Diana range was actually created in 1996, before her tragic death, but its the new advertising campaign that has caused all the controversy. The Chinese company had no intention of causing offence, they aimed to honor Princess Diana and wanted Chinese consumers to love and feel a British style.

Princess Diana - Chinese Lingerie Advert

In the last decade the Diana range has become extremely popular, and it is in fact one of the most influential lingerie brands in China.

It should be noted that the range was also inspired by Diana – the goddess of the moon. Unfortunately for Jealousy International the British public merely see the products as blatant exploitation.

The video above entitled ‘For Love’ (为爱 – Wèi ài) was released online this month by Crystal CG. It’s an animation that resembles the great battle between the fast food giants KFC and McDonald’s as they fight to dominate China.

The history of KFC and McDonald’s in China
A logical place to start is the beginning. You may be surprised to know that it was KFC or as the Chinese call it Kěn Dé Jī (肯德基) who first entered China. Thursday 12th November, 1987 was the day when KFC opened its first restaurant in Beijing (shown in the image below).

McDonald’s aka Mài dāng láo (麦当劳) on the other hand, did not enter the Chinese market until 1990. Thus KFC had a 3 year head start.

KFC China: First restaurant in Beijing

The reason why KFC entered China before McDonald’s was because each produced differing research results of Chinese consumers. McDonald’s research said that the Chinese were very stubborn and were unlikely to take to McDonald’s products.

KFC on the other hand found quite the contrary, their research said the Chinese will love the ‘xīfāng de kuàicān’ (西方的快餐) which translates in English to ‘Western fast food’!

What happened next?
Well, at first, the restaurants sat peacefully side-by-side with KFC selling chicken and McDonald’s selling hamburgers – that was that. However, things soon turned ugly.

KFC vs. McDonalds - China Chicken Fight

McDonald’s was not satisfied with being second to KFC in China, so they started selling chicken wings too and so battle begun. In 1999, a full scale price war broke out between the two, but come 2004 despite McDonald’s attacks KFC‘s market share was 25% greater.

Why was KFC coming out on top?
The answer is simple. KFC understood and catered to the Chinese people far better.

Of course chicken was already a popular part of many meals in China but KFC did more than offer a new take on how to cook chicken, they adapted their whole product range to meet Chinese needs but more importantly their local needs. That’s right, province to province, and this gave KFC the edge over its rival as McDonald’s stuck firmly with its Western style.

Cue the McDonald’s fight back
In 2003, the McDonald’s slogan became ‘I’m lovin’ it’ and the importance the restaurant chain placed on the Chinese market was demonstrated in the advert they created which featured American singer / actor Leehom Wang (Wáng Lìhóng – 王力宏):

As well as this Maccy D’s began to open 24 hour branches, KFC quickly adapted an began to offer match the offering. The battle between the two was becoming fiercer and fiercer. The next plan of attack came in the form of McDonald’s drive-thru restaurants and these gave the big M chain a slight but key advantage.

McDonald's Drive Thru restaurant - China

McDonald's China - Nanjing

What does the future hold?

KFC is still outdoing McDonald’s and the chain is further catering greatly to the local Chinese markets as their recent ‘rice bowl’ ( ad campaign shows. However, McDonald’s are not giving up and their plans for next few years will certainly keep Colonel Harland Sander’s chain on its toes.

In fact McDonald’s has just kicked off its 20th anniversary celebrations in China with a lovely social media campaign on Douban.com

McDonald's Social Media campaign - Douban.com (20 years)

It seems the battle for China has really only just begun…

I’d like to introduce you all to Forever Bicycles (永久 – Yǒng jiǔ).

Forever C Bikes

For those of you who have no idea who this organisation is I’ll give you a quick introduction. Forever Bicycles stretch back all the way to 1940 when the company was orignially founded as Shanghai Forever Co. Ltd.

50 years down the line the organisation was listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and following the turn of the millenia the company turned it’s focus to creating eco-friendly products.

Forever Bicycles produces four million bikes per year and is the top domestic producer of bikes  in China. This week the organisation announced that a new range of bikes will launch shortly under the brand Forever C (永久C).

Forever C logo
One can draw comparisons of this new brand / range to Adidas’sAdidas Orginals brand. It essentially takes old styled bikes and gives them a modern makeover. They are as the cool kids say – retro.

So why the name Forever C?
Well the ‘C’ has six meanings:

  • China – 中国 (Zhōng guó)
  • Classic – 经典 (Jīng diǎn)
  • City – 都市 (Dū shì)
  • Colourful – 多彩 (Duō cǎi)
  • Cycle – 自行车 (Zì xíng chē)
  • Culture – 文化 (Wén huà)

With the above in mind, the new brand offers consumers bicycles that are light, eco-friendly, stylish, and modern. They are available from September, and the Forever C website launches August 20th 2010. As part of this announcement Forever C has already released some seriously cool print ads (below):

Forever C - Print Ad 1

Forever C - Print Ad 2

Forever C - Print Ad 3

Forever C - Print Ad 4

Forever C - Print Ad 5

Forever C - Print Ads 6

Forever C - Print Ad 7

I don’t know about you but I’d love to get my hands on one…

Forever C - Bicycle

Sprite - Cool for Summer

Recent blogposts have been relatively lengthy of late. So here’s a quick post for you.

The advertisement below is one of three created for Sprite’s 透心凉一夏 (Tòu xīn liáng yī xià) or in English ‘Cool for Summer‘ campaign:

Sprite has created a branded site on renren.com. Renren.com is essentially China’s answer to Facebook known in English as ‘The Everyone Network). As part of the Cool for Summer promotion tickets to see popstar JJ Lin in concert are up for grabs, and in order to enter the contest Sprite drinkers must participate in various activities on the renren site such as video sharing.

It’s another great example of big brands trying to create online communities in the Chinese market.

This is not the most exciting advertisement of late, but nevertheless it is currently the main feature on KFC China’s homepage.

For those interested in the Chinese text it’s 西班牙红烩 烤鸡腿堡 (Xībānyá hóng huì kǎo jītuǐ bǎo) roughly translated to Spanish roast chicken braised in red sauce…mmm?

KFC China: Spanish Style Chicken Burger Promo Poster

Credit to: Ogilvy & Mather Shanghai Branch

Today’s advertisement comes courtesy of Leo Burnett. The ad promotes a new range of Bosch refrigerators launching in China.

Bosch looks to stand out from its rivals by offering consumers the option to customise the refrigerators’ glass doors with a selection of bright colours. So it’s out with the monotones – and in with the red, yellow and blues.

The campaign slogan is: 缤纷炫彩随你变 (Bīnfēn xuàn cǎi suí nǐ biàn) which literally translates to “Fun and bright as you change“. The advert itself turns the fridge-freezers into Tetris cubes and shows a robotic arm picking up the household appliances and using them to play a large-scale version of Tetris. A very nice ad indeed.

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